New Dell Desktop Cuts the Power

Wednesday Sep 13th 2006 by Clint Boulton
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The company announces its first business desktop computer designed to help corporations slash energy costs associated with using PCs.

For computer makers, sometimes less is more.

That's the position Dell took earlier this week at a technology event here, announcing the company's first business desktop computer designed to help corporations slash energy costs associated with using PCs.

Dell CEO Kevin Rollins unveiled the OptiPlex 745, a machine that offers greater performance, manageability and security while simultaneously saving businesses almost $1 billion per year on power costs.

"This reduction in power is significant and reduces annual PC costs by $80 [per desktop]," Rollins said. "We recognize that energy consumption is and will be an emerging, critical requirement [in corporations]."

The move is the latest in a series of feverish efforts from computer and server makers to help customers bring down the costs associated with running several machines on a network or data center.

While the costs have been skyrocketing, the extra heat threatens to cook the valuable gear and data housed in the machines.

Dell rivals IBM, HP and Sun Microsystems have already unveiled servers, fans and chips that aim to keep power consumption down.

Rollins said the OptiPlex 745, the first in a new line that was redesigned based on customer feedback, also employs Dell's HyperCool thermal management technology, a new easy-to-use interface for improved control, user authentication and encryption.

The machine runs the new Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 chip, which Intel claims helps users save 40 percent on power costs.

The OptiPlex 745 also includes Dell Energy Smart power management settings; Dell Client Manager for remote management and troubleshooting; Dell configuration services; and Embassy Trust Suite security software for encryption.

Starting at $899 with a three-year warranty, the OptiPlex 745 is Microsoft Vista-ready. Customers can buy a 745 PC with a 17-inch flat panel screen for $1,098.

Rollins also said Dell is backing up its power savings pledge with a new energy resource guide on the Dell.com Web site.

The site offers calculators, as well as a data center capacity planner for customers to gauge energy costs and consumption.

Article appeared originally on Internetnews.com.

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